Food labeling is a valuable public health tool. Labels can help consumers select healthier foods. Having to disclose what's in a product can also push industry to reformulate foods to have better nutritional value.

CSPI has a long history of working to transform the food labeling landscape. Our efforts have led to improved transparency and accountability from food companies. Our victories include warnings on alcohol, the mandatory “Nutrition Facts” panel, and allergen disclosures. But our work is not done!

We are continuing to ensure that food labels evolve in response to changes in the food industry, consumer preferences, and advances in nutrition science.

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Tell Congress to pass the Food Labeling Modernization Act

The Food Labeling Modernization Act will strengthen food labeling requirements to promote public health and nutrition.

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How can we fix food labels?

CSPI Comments to FDA on the Use of the Names of Dairy Foods in the Labeling of Plant-based Products

Front-of-package labeling

Many countries are adopting simple, interpretive front-of-package nutrition labeling systems, but the U.S. is lagging behind.

Menu labeling

Chain restaurants are now required to post calorie counts for their menu items, and make additional nutrition info available upon request.

Alcohol labeling

Alcoholic beverages should have calorie, ingredient, and serving information just like all other beverages!

plate with the US map in the middle

State & local solutions

Grassroots activists at the state and local level are building support for food labeling policies to support health.

Combat misleading claims

The food industry uses marketing claims to create the illusion of healthfulness for packaged foods regardless of how healthy they truly are.

Ingredients & allergens

Consumers deserve to know what’s in their food, and it’s currently far too difficult to tell whether certain ingredients are present.

An ingredients label

CSPI's clean labeling campaign

Consumers have gotten the message: There are unsafe and poorly tested chemicals in everyday foods and beverages. As concern grows, shoppers are increasingly demanding foods and beverages that are free from concerning additives.

Companies have responded to these consumer demands by offering “clean label” foods. But because industry’s clean labels campaigns are not always centered around safety, consumers are confused about what “clean label” means.

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